FMM 1 9 15 Left Luggage

FMM 1 9 15 Left Luggage
“Nothing in the universe can stop you from letting go and starting over.”
~ Guy Finley.

Jamaicans have a phrase, ‘two long hand’ which they use to describe a person who presents themselves with nothing to offer. Imagine you invite a guest over for a meal and they arrive with not even a bottle of wine, just their ‘two long hand’. Of course you have to first know that Jamaican patois uses ‘hand’ to denote your upper extremities and ‘foot’ describes the lower extremities. Which can be very confusing to someone who is used to separating such limbs into thighs and calves and knees and more! Whenever I travel I long for a day when I can walk onto a plane with nothing but ‘my two long hand’. No need to worry about lifting heavy roller bags into overhead bins, or standing staring at a carousel wondering if this is the time that my luggage will just not appear.
It is almost freeing to think about losing a whole bag of belongings. Sure there are things that are irreplaceable, that you will miss. But (of course you need to have the money to do this) imagine starting out with a whole new wardrobe! When my working life seems to be trapped with piles of unfiled papers, stacks of unsorted extra copies of who knows what stacked up on my desk, I often fantasize about dropping a tiny but effective hand grenade which would instantly turn everything on my desk to dust, and I could start over. No need to worry about what I should keep, and what to discard, so sorry, it’s history.
In our lives we often drag around tons of unnecessary baggage, thoughts and emotions that have their seeds in some distant situation, that over time have grown and evolved into boulders that weigh us down. Last year I watched the amazing Ms Iyanla Vanzant as she would dig through the rubble of people’s dysfunctional lives and help them to let go of their source of pain and frustration. Often we need an impartial outsider who won’t feed into the stories we tell ourselves, who will compassionately but dispassionately remind us what is important and what should just be left behind.
I read a line somewhere that warned against staring into a mirror, for you will only see what is behind you. We need to look through a window, to be looking forward. But sometimes we fall in love with our stories, and use them to justify everything that is wrong with our lives. Our bodies react to the stories that our ever busy mind tells us. We allow our sleep to be disturbed by busy neurons in our brains that conjure up all manner of potential situations. Neurons that love to pull together random experiences and create chapters and chapters of distractions. Our thoughts are the product of complex chemical reactions. They don’t have to be the ruler of our lives. We need to get them under control. We can observe them as you would those entertaining grandkids that you can send to their parents when you run out of patience, and instead focus on the real world that is happening around us, instead of being ruled by the imaginary world inside our heads.
These deep-seated memories of past wrongs and hurt can take on a life of their own. We often have forgotten the original incident, but have fall back into unhealthy patterns that hold us back. Imagine if, instead of trying to right the wrongs, to decide once and for all who threw the first blow, we just dropped everything by the wayside, left it in lost and found, and started afresh. Over these past decades we have learnt that most of technology responds favorably to a quick ‘reboot’. Just turn it off, count to ten, then turn it on again. Resetting our emotional hard drive requires that same concept. Turn off those automatic responses. Cool off for a count of ten or more. And when you turn back on, see if you have reset the reaction. Try looking at things from a different point of view. Sometimes by choosing to see things from another angle we can change our reaction to it.
Already since the new year started we are being forced to think about the baggage that we carry. The movie ‘Selma’ tells the story of the strength of the people, the ordinary people not the politicians, to force a nation to change. They refused to be weighed down by the baggage of their past and by marching tall and free (while facing the threat of violence) they brought about a change in social consciousness. In Paris we are reminded of the power of the pen to enlighten or incite. We are challenged to find new ways of helping people make their voices heard, so they do not feel compelled to resort to violence.
On this Friday morning, I hope you are able to identify those things that are holding you back, bless them and set them free. When we can start each day with a fresh vision, when we realize we can choose whether we walk around weighted down with suitcases or instead stand tall with our ‘two long hand’, it frees us up to accept the gifts which we are given today, here and now.
Have a wonderful weekend, family!
One Love!
Namaste.

 

Jamaicans have a phrase, ‘two long hand’ which they use to describe a person who presents themselves with nothing to offer.  Imagine you invite a guest over for a meal and they arrive with not even a bottle of wine, just their ‘two long hand’.  Of course you have to first know that Jamaican patois uses ‘hand’ to denote your upper extremities and ‘foot’ describes the lower extremities.  Which can be very confusing to someone who is used to separating such limbs into thighs and calves and knees and more!  Whenever I travel I long for a day when I can walk onto a plane with nothing but ‘my two long hand’.  No need to worry about lifting heavy roller bags into overhead bins, or standing staring at a carousel wondering if this is the time that my luggage will just not appear.

It is almost freeing to think about losing a whole bag of belongings.  Sure there are things that are irreplaceable, that you will miss.  But (of course you need to have the money to do this) imagine starting out with a whole new wardrobe!  When my working life seems to be trapped with piles of unfiled papers, stacks of unsorted extra copies of who knows what stacked up on my desk, I often fantasize about dropping a tiny but effective hand grenade which would instantly turn everything on my desk to dust, and I could start over.  No need to worry about what I should keep, and what to discard, so sorry, it’s history.

In our lives we often drag around tons of unnecessary baggage, thoughts and emotions that have their seeds in some distant situation, that over time have grown and evolved into boulders that weigh us down.  Last year I watched the amazing Ms Iyanla Vanzant as she would dig through the rubble of people’s dysfunctional lives and help them to let go of their source of pain and frustration.  Often we need an impartial outsider who won’t feed into the stories we tell ourselves, who will compassionately but dispassionately remind us what is important and what should just be left behind.

I read a line somewhere that warned against staring into a mirror, for you will only see what is behind you.  We need to look through a window, to be looking forward.  But sometimes we fall in love with our stories, and use them to justify everything that is wrong with our lives.  Our bodies react to the stories that our ever busy mind tells us.  We allow our sleep to be disturbed by busy neurons in our brains that conjure up all manner of potential situations.  Neurons that love to pull together random experiences and create chapters and chapters of distractions.  Our thoughts are the product of complex chemical reactions.  They don’t have to be the ruler of our lives.  We need to get them under control.  We can observe them as you would those entertaining grandkids that you can send to their parents when you run out of patience, and instead focus on the real world that is happening around us, instead of being ruled by the imaginary world inside our heads.

These deep-seated memories of past wrongs and hurt can take on a life of their own.  We often have forgotten the original incident, but have fall back into unhealthy patterns that hold us back.  Imagine if, instead of trying to right the wrongs, to decide once and for all who threw the first blow, we just dropped everything by the wayside, left it in lost and found, and started afresh.  Over these past decades we have learnt that most of technology responds favorably to a quick ‘reboot’.  Just turn it off, count to ten, then turn it on again.  Resetting our emotional hard drive requires that same concept.  Turn off those automatic responses.  Cool off for a count of ten or more.  And when you turn back on, see if you have reset the reaction.  Try looking at things from a different point of view.  Sometimes by choosing to see things from another angle we can change our reaction to it.

Already since the new year started we are being forced to think about the baggage that we carry.  The movie ‘Selma’ tells the story of the strength of the people, the ordinary people not the politicians, to force a nation to change.  They refused to be weighed down by the baggage of their past and by marching tall and free (while facing the threat of violence) they brought about a change in social consciousness.  In Paris we are reminded of the power of the pen to enlighten or incite.  We are challenged to find new ways of helping people make their voices heard, so they do not feel compelled to resort to violence.

On this Friday morning, I hope you are able to identify those things that are holding you back, bless them and set them free.  When we can start each day with a fresh vision, when we realize we can choose whether we walk around weighted down with suitcases or instead stand tall with our ‘two long hand’, it frees us up to accept the gifts which we are given today, here and now.

Have a wonderful weekend, family!

One Love!

Namaste.
 

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